Dedicated to improving education and debate in medical ethics

As a charitable organisation we promote and support the impartial study and understanding of medical ethics and its integration into clinical practice through education, research, and publication.

Another successful IME virtual seminar with guest speaker @KavitaShahArora discussing co-authored recent article in @JME_BMJ.
If you missed it, the recording is now live on our website:
https://ime-uk.org/events-and-news/news/ethical-challenges-for-womens-healthcare-highlighted-by-the-covid-19-pandemic-video-recording/

https://jme.bmj.com/content/47/2/69

Proportionate force or restraint can be used in order to force a woman, suffering from agoraphobia, to attend hospital to give birth- a decision reached in her best interests. Was the right decision reached?
@RCObsGyn @Nuffbioethics @bmj_latest
https://www.theguardian.com/uk-news/2021/may/14/agoraphobic-pregnant-woman-can-be-forced-into-hospital-judge-rules

I wrote a piece on the inappropriateness of the (very) common expression "to consent a patient" in the BMJ a while ago. It is here: https://bit.ly/3w8vN58. As is the case for 99.9% of my articles, I suspect it made no a jot of difference in real life! Oh well. https://twitter.com/philippa_uk/status/1392979817163853826

Philippa Hammond@philippa_uk

@DanielSokol9 I don't like the linguistic suggestion that 'consent' is something you do to a patient.

It's something we give you after you have given us full, open, honest, truthful facts.

You don't do that = we can't consent.

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